Not so long ago, the mere mention of ‘hotel art’ would be followed with little excitement, bringing up associations with bland artworks hung merely to fill in the gaps.

Thankfully, that association is dying out with the realisation that a thoughtfully-curated art collection can be a big, tangible business for the hospitality world. Globalised consumers increasingly demand more individualised experiences and art very much has a role to play in answering that demand, as well as in expressing a hotel’s brand values, ethos, sense of place and taste.

We take a look at the benefits of using bespoke artworks in hospitality spaces…

Large-scale abstract paintings are being replaced with ‘salon hangs’, offering a unique experience from cosmopolitan city hotspots to rural retreats.

The good thing about art trends is that it moves more slowly than interiors. Investing in artwork is a medium-long term bet and not subject to the same blink-of-the-eye peaks and troughs in taste as other interiors trends. In other words, it’s going to stay around.

Salon hangs offer hoteliers and restaurant operators an array of benefits. One of these is that relatively inexpensive art, when grouped en masse, they can create a bespoke and high-visual impact, as the viewer’s eye tends to focus on the whole rather than the individual.

Take Sketch for example, which doubles as a novel exhibition space for a whopping 239 drawings by British artist David Shrigley. Wrapping around 3 of the restaurant’s rose-pink walls, Shrigley’s monochrome musings hang in a systematic grid and form part of what the establishment describes as a ‘long-term programme of artist-conceived restaurants’.

From charity shop finds to budget-friendly prints, when dramatically gathered together, the overall value of the art can be transformed into more than the sum of its parts. Salon hangs offer hoteliers and restaurant operators an array of benefits. One of these is that relatively inexpensive art, when grouped en masse, can create a bespoke and high-visual impact, as the viewer’s eye tends to focus on the whole rather than the individual.

Salon hangs also provide an opportunity for cohesive storytelling. This can take the form of a literal narrative, drawing on the room’s interior for inspiration, to a more abstract engagement with culture.

For a hospitality brand looking to make meaningful ties with its locality, hoteliers can engage with local cultural institutions, working with regional art schools for example, or galleries and museums. Ideas here might include a wall curated with paintings produced by a single artist, or else a showcase of the latest burgeoning talent from art students or a collection that links with a local museum exhibition.

What’s really great about salon hangs is that even without a collection relaying a specific narrative, forming an ad-hoc assemblage of varying monetary value, theme and palette, space nevertheless is seen to boast an aesthetic that appears, above all, considered and contemporary.

Salon hangs also allow you to add to a collection over time, allowing public areas to be continually transforming spaces rather than static interiors in need of periodic, cost-prohibitive refurbishments. Hanging art in the salon style is dynamic and dramatic and offers hotels the benefit of creating unique, flexible spaces that hook the imagination and leave behind a truly memorable impression.

What more could anyone ask for?

Story inspired by @HI_magazine

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